Saxon Road Garages Demolished

Some residents will be aware of the damage to the Saxon Road Garages in Stamford Bridge and that they have been demolished.

ERYC Intend To Rebuild

I am delighted to confirm that ERYC have stated:

“We do intend to rebuild subject to going out to tender and tender price being realistic”

I will keep residents informed.

The Full Story

It is understandable that there are many rumours as to what happen and why the garages had to be demolished. The following explains the full story.

“A call was received at the ERYC Carnaby Depot on 20th February 2018 at around 10am outlining details of a vehicle impact to the Saxon Road garages, Stamford Bridge. An ERYC Structural Engineer attend site that day at around 3pm.

Given the extent of the damage caused, the condition of the remaining units, and the ability to resource replacement parts, it is advised that both blocks of garages are demolished.

It was possible for the majority of tenants to remove their possessions from their respective units prior to demolition, with the exception of the units directly either side of the front elevation pier to ‘Block A’ where the roof required propping and the unit emptying by an approved contractor.

The site is located directly to the West of the school site on Godwinsway. There are two separate blocks of garages, noted as ‘A’ [the west 6 unit block] and ‘B’ [the east 9 unit block]. The two blocks appear to be constructed in precast sectional concrete panels, bolted together on site, with the primary vertical ‘column’ sections then being infilled with horizontal precast concrete sections. The roof structure consists of a series of proprietary steel trusses supporting corrugated asbestos sheets. Each unit appears to have an up and over steel garage door, fixed back to the internal cross walls.

It appears that the vehicle, after departing Block ‘B’ traversed the area between the two garage blocks and came to a halt after impact with the front elevation of Block A and a garaged vehicle. The impact with the garaged vehicle pushed the vehicle into the rear wall of the unit, resulting in the rear wall being demolished.

The front wall pier and cross wall between units has been damaged beyond repair, with the doors and their timber frames to the units either side of the pier now distorted and wedged into position.

Viewed from the rear of the Block, the roof sheeting does not appear to have disturbed to any large degree. There is a deep covering of moss that has accumulated on the roof deck to the majority of its area.

Block A in its entirety is in a relatively poor state of repair, with one of the door head sections having been replaced with timber. The majority of the vertical piers were measured as being out of plumb by some 10mm or more in the length of a 900mm long spirit level in both the length and width of the Block.

It appears that the vehicle has first reversed into the rear of the unit in which it was parked, prior to the collision with Block A. This resulted in the demolition of the rear wall of the unit. The units immediately adjacent to this one do not appear to have suffered any damage as a result of the impact.

Viewed from the rear of the Block, the roof sheeting does not appear to have disturbed to any large degree. There is a deep covering of moss that has accumulated on the roof deck to the majority of its area.

Block B in its entirety is in a relatively poor state of repair, with several of the door head sections having been replaced with timber, and the remaining sections having exposed reinforcement. The majority of the vertical piers were measured as being out of plumb by some 10mm or more in the length of a 900mm long spirit level in both the length and width of the Block.

The garage units have very little by way of lateral stability in their original state, and with the degraded sections with exposed steel reinforcement, this stability will have been reduced.

The front elevation must rely on some stiffness in the connection between the vertical piers and door head panels, and with more than half of the head panels having been removed, and the remainder being weakened due to corrosion of the embedded steel reinforcement over their lifetime, little remains by way of structural ‘strength’ to the front elevation.

Add to this –

  • Out of plumb to the majority of the vertical units in both directions
  • Additional dead / permanent load on the roof by way of a build-up of moss
  • The recent impact to the units by a vehicle
  • The likelihood of being able to resource replacement sections

And precious little remains to recommend the repair of the remaining units.”

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